How to spot health misinformation and disinformation online

The internet is a powerful tool for accessing and sharing information, but it can also be a source of confusion and misinformation. Especially when it comes to health topics, it is important to be able to distinguish between accurate and reliable information, and misinformation and disinformation.

Misinformation is false or inaccurate information that is spread unintentionally or without malicious intent. Disinformation is false or inaccurate information that is spread deliberately or with malicious intent, often to influence public opinion or obscure the truth.

Both misinformation and disinformation can have serious consequences for our health and well-being, as they can lead to wrong decisions, harmful behaviours, or distrust in health authorities and experts. Therefore, we need to be critical and careful when we encounter health information online, whether it is in the form of an article, an advert, or a video.

Here are some tips on how to spot health misinformation and disinformation online:

  • Check the source. Who is behind the information? Is it a reputable organisation, a qualified expert, or a credible media outlet? Or is it an unknown website, a biased group, or a dubious influencer? Look for the credentials, affiliations, and contact details of the source, and verify them if possible. Be wary of sources that are anonymous, vague, or inconsistent.
  • Check the evidence. What is the basis of the information? Is it supported by scientific research, verified data, or official guidelines? Or is it based on personal opinions, anecdotes, or rumours? Look for references, citations, and links to the original sources of the evidence, and check them if possible. Be wary of information that is unsupported, outdated, or contradictory.
  • Check the purpose. What is the goal of the information? Is it to inform, educate, or raise awareness? Or is it to persuade, manipulate, or deceive? Look for the tone, language, and style of the information, and how it appeals to your emotions, logic, or values. Be wary of information that is sensationalist, exaggerated, or misleading.
  • Check the quality. How is the information presented? Is it clear, accurate, and coherent? Or is it vague, inaccurate, or confusing? Look for the spelling, grammar, and punctuation of the information, and how it uses images, graphics, or videos. Be wary of information that is poorly written, edited, or produced.
  • Check with others. What do other sources say about the information? Is it consistent with what you already know or have learned from reliable sources? Or is it different from or contradictory to what you know or have learned from reliable sources? Look for alternative perspectives, opinions, or experiences on the same topic, and compare them with the information you have. Be wary of information that is isolated, unchallenged, or disputed.
  • By following these tips, you can become a more informed and responsible consumer of health information online. Remember that not everything you see or hear on the internet is true or trustworthy. Always think critically and carefully before you believe or share health information online.

Blog post by

Dave Lee

Dave Lee

Dave Lee is the co-founder of Amac, he continues to write and produce all our courses and you might even find him teaching you.

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